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newsletter out

2014 May 12
by bvancampenhout

photo credit CIAT

photo credit CIAT

Hello, and welcome to the IFPRI Uganda Strategy Support Program’s weekly news digest.

This weekly collection of recent news articles related to agriculture is compiled from online news sources. We also include links to recent publications on agricultural and policy-related research topics pertinent to Uganda.

In news this week, we report on walking the talk: why and how African governments should transform their agriculture spending. In addition, there is more news on the Bibliography of gender & agriculture resources and Supporting communities in building resilience through agro-pastoral field schools among others.

Under agricultural and food policy related research, we provide links to papers on:

Remember that if you want to get this newsletter weekly in your inbox, you can subscribe here.

 

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newsletter for week of May 5th

2014 May 6
by bvancampenhout

2012-05-18 10.27.36Hello, a massive newsletter this week!!! Do you want to get this newsletter delivered weekly in you inbox? Click here.

In news this week, we report on Enhancing resistance to Coffee Wilt Disease in Uganda - the conventional way. We also have news on East Africa: five countries join forces to tackle cassava diseases and Africa: Smallholder Farmers Africa's Game Changer among many others.

Under agricultural and food policy related research, we provide links to papers on:

Thank you, and enjoy.
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New study by IFPRI Kampala staff

2014 May 5
by bvancampenhout

photo credit shanidov

photo credit shanidov

Nassul Kabunga, associate research fellow of IFPRI based in the Kampala office, published a new study entitled "Can smallholder fruit and vegetable production systems improve household food security and nutritional status of women? Evidence from rural Uganda". The study is co-authored with Shibani Ghosh and Jeffrey Griffiths  from Tufts University.

The paper aims to empirically infer potential causal linkages between fruit and vegetable ( F&V) production, individual F&V intake, household food security , and anemia levels for individual women caregivers of childbearing age. Using a unique and rich dataset recently collected from rural smallholder Ugandan households, we show that the use of a qualitative tool to measure household food insecurity is robust and applicable in other contexts. We also show , using robust econometric methods , that women living in F&V - producer households have a significantly higher intake of F&V s than those living in non producer households. Furthermore, F&V - producer households are potentially more food secure , and women caregivers in producer households have significantly higher levels of hemoglobin, rendering the prevalence rates of anemia lower among F&V - producer households. We argue that these effects, modest as they are, could be further improved if there were deliberate efforts to promote the intensification of smallholder F&V production.

The paper can be downloaded here.

Next CGIAR Kampala research seminar

2014 April 30
by bvancampenhout

photo credit: Sarah McCans

photo credit: Sarah McCans

We are pleased to invite you to the next CGIAR-Uganda Research-seminar at IITA/IFPRI, Naguru East Road plot 15, Kampala on Wednesday 7nd of May from 14.00 to 15.00 PM

Influence of the diversity in farms growing coffee on the use of recommended coffee management practices in Uganda

By

Ghislaine Bongers, associate professional officer, IITA


Abstract

Many smallholder farm systems in Uganda produce coffee as an important cash crop. Yet coffee yields are poor. To increase farmers' production, a range of agronomic practices have been recommended by national and international agencies, but the adoption potential of recommendations differ between farm systems. To understand the differences in adoption potential of recommended coffee management practices in Uganda, we provide a typology of farm systems with coffee, assess the diversity between the farm types, and evaluate the current use of existing management recommendations for each farm type. Through factor analysis and cluster analysis of farms producing coffee, we identified five farm types: large coffee farms, farms with off-farm activities, coffee-dependent farms, diversified farms, and banana-coffee farms. The farm types are based on differences in size, and in the relative contributions of coffee, banana and off-farm labour to total household income. They also differ in the availability of the resources labour, land and cash, in coffee production and revenue, and in current use of most recommended practices. Qualitative analysis indicates that farm types have different constraints and opportunities to adopt recommendations. Our results highlight that an analysis of different farm systems with coffee production, a level beyond the 'coffee farmer community' as a homogenous entity, is important in order to understand the scope for success or failure of recommended practices.

Please note that the *next* CGIAR-Uganda Research- seminar will be on Wednesday June 4rd, 2014, 14.00 PM.

If you are interested to present at a CGIAR-Uganda Research-seminar, please let us know!

CGIAR-Kampala research seminars take place every first wednesday of the month between 2 and 3 pm. They are born out of the desire of a group of researchers to discuss their research in depth to peers, as opposed to presenting summaries and policy recommendations in our daily outreach to policy makers. As such, potential presenters should not shy away from more technical issues that they want comments and feedback on.

newsletter of week of 28 April 2014

2014 April 29
by bvancampenhout

Credit: Global Crop Diversity Trust

Credit: Global Crop Diversity Trust

Hello, and welcome to the IFPRI Uganda Strategy Support Program’s weekly news digest.

In news this week, we report on slight increase in Uganda agriculture budget. We also have news on Farmers harvest rain water to improve food security and Coffee, cotton still vital to the economy among others.

Under agricultural and food policy related research, we provide links to papers on:

Identifying and addressing land governance constraints to support intensification and land market operation: Evidence from 10 African countries

Thank you, and enjoy.
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newsletter week of april 21st 2014

2014 April 23
by bvancampenhout

copyright Andy Kristian Agaba/Gates Foundation

copyright Andy Kristian Agaba/Gates Foundation

Hello, and welcome to the IFPRI Uganda Strategy Support Program’s weekly news digest.
The PASIC project, in which IFPRI-kampala is involved, made the news this week!

 

In addition, we report on A Green Revolution, this time for Africa. We also have news on Bananageddon: Millions face hunger as deadly fungus Panama disease decimates global banana crop and Removing Africa's Obsolete Crop Protection Products among others.

Under agricultural and food policy related research, we provide links to papers on:

Thank you, and enjoy.
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weekly newsletter for week of April 7th and 14th

2014 April 16
by bvancampenhout

https://flic.kr/p/jAXjSeHello, and welcome to the IFPRI Uganda Strategy Support Program’s weekly news digest.

This weekly collection of recent news articles related to agriculture in Uganda is compiled from online news sources. We also include links to recent publications on agricultural and policy-related research topics pertinent to Uganda.

In news this week, we report on Uganda's Coffee Sector Works Towards a Climate Resilient Value Chain. There’s also news on Fake seeds force Ugandan farmers to resort to 'bronze age' agriculture and Questions over Karamoja food security plan among others.

Under agricultural and food policy related research, we provide links to papers on:

Thank you, and enjoy.
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Collective Learning Workshop to officially launch PASIC project at Kabira Country Club

2014 April 10
by bvancampenhout

pasicworkshopToday, IITA, IFPRI, EPRC and MAAIF are organizing a collective learning workshop at the Kabira Country Club in Kampala. This serves at the same time to officially launch the Policy Action for the Sustainable Intensification of Crops in Uganda (PASIC) project.

 

The minister of agriculture, Tess Bucyanayandi shared with us, during his opening speech, the challenges he faces when during policy making and implementation as a minister.   These include limited involvement of stakeholders in policy formulation and implementation, and the often long and complicated process of implementing the policies. He also mentioned that it is often not clear which institutions and organizations are responsible  and should be hold accountable for delays in implementation.  In addition, poor monitoring and evaluation of policies was mentioned as key constraints. Policies also often  are born out of ideology instead being based in solid, evidence based research.

newsletter of week of 31st of March 2014

2014 April 2
by bvancampenhout

copyright WFP

copyright WFP

Welcome to the IFPRI Uganda Strategy Support Program’s weekly news digest.

 

This week’s news reports on ‘Uganda in regional effort to tackle cassava viruses’. Under agricultural and food policy related research, we provide links to papers and publications on:

Thank you, and enjoy.

read more...

next research seminar at IFPRI Kampala

2014 March 27
by bvancampenhout

copyright CYMMIT

copyright CYMMIT

We are pleased to invite you to the next CGIAR-Uganda Research-seminar at IITA/IFPRI, Naguru East Road plot 15, Kampala on Wednesday 2th of April from 14.00 to 15.00 PM

Promoting Sustainable Adoption of High-Yielding Maize: Evidence from BRAC Uganda's Agriculture Programme, Baseline Analysis

By

Jonah Rexer, Research Associate, BRAC Uganda Research and Evaluation Unit

Abstract

While there is a large literature on evaluating the effectiveness of both agricultural extension services and input supply chain interventions, there is relatively little empirical analysis of the sustainability of such interventions once external supports are removed. This report presents an experimental design and baseline analysis to evaluate the sustainability of agricultural extension services provided by the non-profit BRAC Uganda. The study compares the effect sustainability of a) improved seed provision through community-based agro-dealers and b) agricultural training and farmer group-formation through extension agents. Employing cross-sectional baseline data on 1,659 farming households in Eastern Uganda, this report analyzes correlates of adoption of high-yielding variety (HYV) maize seed sold by BRAC, the demand function for these seeds, and early treatment effects of a randomized phase-out of the two interventions. We find that adoption of BRAC seed is driven primarily by household poverty, assets, and farm size. However, free seed distribution increases adoption, and is not found to act as a disincentive. The demand function for BRAC seed appears to be discontinuous and relatively elastic at lower quantities. Treatment effects of phasing out agro-dealers on adoption of BRAC and HYV seeds are negative, indicating a lack of sustainability, but also an important market-clearing role. Preliminary analysis of a production function indicates yield effects of HYV seed in general, but not from the BRAC "brand."
Please note that the *next* CGIAR-Uganda Research- seminar will be on Wednesday May 7nd, 2014, 14.00 PM.

If you are interested to present at a CGIAR-Uganda Research-seminar, please let us know!

CGIAR-Kampala research seminars take place every first wednesday of the month between 2 and 3 pm. They are born out of the desire of a group of researchers to discuss their research in depth to peers, as opposed to presenting summaries and policy recommendations in our daily outreach to policy makers. As such, potential presenters should not shy away from more technical issues that they want comments and feedback on.