Skip to content

Weekly newsletter of week of 17th March 2014

2014 March 17
by bvancampenhout

copyright Els Lecoutere

copyright Els Lecoutere

Welcome to the IFPRI Uganda Strategy Support Program’s weekly news digest.

This week’s news reports on Rice becomes preferred cash crop in Uganda. Under agricultural and food policy related research, we provide links to papers and publications on:

Thank you, and enjoy.
read more...

Next CGIAR Kampala seminar – Brooke Bocast on “Housing” and Female Friendship in Uganda

2014 March 11
by bvancampenhout

copyright DFAT

copyright DFAT

We are pleased to invite you to the next CGIAR-Uganda Research-seminar at IITA/IFPRI, Naguru East Road plot 15, Kampala on Wednesday 12th of March, from 14.00 to 15.00 PM

‘Housing’ and Female Friendship in Urban Uganda

By

Brooke Bocast, Senior Doctoral Fellow, Center for the Humanities, Temple University
This paper examines the relationship between “sugar daddyism” and emerging forms of female sociality among young, educated women in urban Uganda. In particular, I demonstrate how the practice of ‘housing’ – wherein one man sponsors an outing for multiple women – fosters new spaces for female friendship. Scholars of African social relations have long noted the centrality of material exchange in establishing and maintaining ties of kinship and political patronage; more recently, the interplay between capital and sentiment in sexual relationships has garnered significant attention. Yet friendship, in Africa and elsewhere, remains remarkably undertheorized. Profound generational shifts in sociality, shaped by rural-urban migration, the expansion of higher education, and the influx of Western media, make Uganda a fertile site for the study of new forms of non-kin affiliation. In this paper, I analyze the relations of exchange that simultaneously constitute sugar daddy and female peer relationships. I make three major points: First, although sugar daddyism functions according to logics of asymmetrical exchange, such relationships animate horizontal reciprocity within female peer groups. Second, educated young women discursively construct friendship as a space for “fun,” in opposition to romantic and kin relationships. Third, despite this discursive separation, the co-constitution of friendship and sexual transactions generates conflict between female friends. This paper explores new urban exchange relations as a window onto larger processes of continuity and change in Ugandan social organization.
Please note that the *next* CGIAR-Uganda Research- seminar will be on Wednesday April 2nd, 2014, 14.00 PM.

If you are interested to present at a CGIAR-Uganda Research-seminar, please let us know!

CGIAR-Kampala research seminars take place every first wednesday of the month between 2 and 3 pm. They are born out of the desire of a group of researchers to discuss their research in depth to peers, as opposed to presenting summaries and policy recommendations in our daily outreach to policy makers. As such, potential presenters should not shy away from more technical issues that they want comments and feedback on.

Newsletter week of 10th March 2014

2014 March 10
by bvancampenhout

Welcome to the IFPRI Uganda Strategy Support Program’s weekly news digest.
charleskyando
This week’s news reports on Dirty Hands, Fine Minds: the story of an agricultural research and training network in African universities. Under agricultural and food policy related research, we provide links to papers on:

Thank you, and enjoy.
read more...

The Cost of Hunger in Uganda

2014 March 6
by bvancampenhout

cost of hungerA new report entitled "The Cost of Hunger in Uganda - Implications on National Development and Prosperity has been released yesterday". It is a multi-country study aimed at estimating the economic and social impacts of child under-nutrition in Africa.

A summary of the report can be found here

Launch of IFPRI’s 2013 Global Food Policy Report

2014 March 5
by bvancampenhout

gfprCentral to the discussions of the post-2015 agenda is the goal of eliminating extreme poverty by 2030. Though ambitious and laudable, this goal is not enough. With one in eight people suffering from hunger today, and nearly 2 billion affected by hidden hunger (micronutrient deficiencies), IFPRI’s 2013 Global Food Policy Report suggests that it is equally important to eliminate hunger and undernutrition— and that it can be done by 2025.

IFPRI Director General Shenggen Fan will present an overview of the major food policy developments presented in the Report, and will discuss ways in which post-2015 development efforts can help achieve the aspirational target of eliminating hunger and undernutrition in a sustainable manner by 2025.

Guest speakers, including Homi Kharas, Asma Lateef, and Tjada McKenna, will provide their own perspectives on recent developments influencing food and nutrition security, as well as insights for 2014 and beyond.

Date:  March 12, 2014
Time: 12:15 pm to 1:45 pm EDT (Please join us for lunch beginning at 11:45 am); Live webcast coming up at the scheduled time.

New publication of IFPRI-Kampala

2014 March 4
by bvancampenhout

photo credit EADD/ILRI

photo credit EADD/ILRI

Nassul Kabunga, associate research fellow at the IFPRI Kampala office, just released an interesting new discussion paper on Improved Dairy Cows in Uganda - Pathways to Poverty Alleviation and Improved Child Nutrition.

The paper notes that is limited empirical evidence on the linkages between agro-technologies, poverty reduction and the pathways to better nutrition outcomes. The introduction and dissemination of improved dairy cow breeds in Uganda is arguably the most significant step taken to develop a modern and commercial dairy industry in the country over the last two decades. This study uses a nationally representative sample of Ugandan households to rigorously examine the impact of adoption of improved dairy cow breeds on enterprise-,household-,and individual child-level nutrition outcomes. We find that adopting improved dairy cows significantly increases milk productivity, milk commercialization,and food expenditure. Consequently,adoption substantially reduces household poverty and stunting for children younger than age five. These results are consistent with the perceived role of new agro-technologies. Considering heterogeneity in farm size, we find that households with small farms will increase milk yield and food expenditure while also reducing poverty substantially due to adoption, and large farms increase not only own-milk consumption and commercialization but also nutrition outcomes of children younger than age five. This suggests that the nutritional benefits of adoption may not sufficiently help reduce child malnutrition for young children living on small farms. We argue that for holistic and sustainable improvements in broader welfare and nutrition outcomes, agricultural development programs should be accompanied with related programs on gender empowerment, nutrition education, and food safety and hygiene.

weekly newsletter – week of March 3rd

2014 March 3
by bvancampenhout

Bjorn Van Campenhout

Bjorn Van Campenhout

Welcome to the IFPRI Uganda Strategy Support Program’s weekly news digest.

This week’s news reports on whether middlemen are the key to stronger value-chains in Uganda

Under agricultural and food policy related research, we provide links to papers on:

Thank you, and enjoy.

  read more...

Uganda Weekly Newsletter – week of Feb 17&24th 2014

2014 February 24
by bvancampenhout

maretscaledWelcome to the IFPRI Uganda Strategy Support Program’s weekly news digest.

This week’s news reports on National development plans not in line with government priorities and an article on crop insurance, among many other.

Under agricultural and food policy related research, we provide links to papers on:

Thank you, and enjoy.
read more...

Uganda Weekly Newsletter – week of Feb 10th 2014

2014 February 10
by bvancampenhout

copyright Bjorn Van Campenhout

copyright Bjorn Van Campenhout

Hello, and welcome to the IFPRI Uganda Strategy Support Program’s weekly news digest.

This weekly collection of recent news articles related to agriculture in Uganda is compiled from online news sources. We also include links to recent publications on agricultural and policy-related research topics related to Uganda.

In news this week, we report on Uganda urged to register 82pc of land, AATF Receives Feed the Future Funding to Improve Maize Production in East Africa and How can it be that 87% of Ugandan farmers still don't use improved seed, in addition to many others.

Under agricultural and food policy related research, we provide links to papers on:

Thank you and enjoy

read more...

weekly newsletter – week of feb 3rd

2014 February 3
by bvancampenhout

copyright HarvestPlus

copyright HarvestPlus

Hello, and welcome to the IFPRI Uganda Strategy Support Program’s weekly news digest.

This weekly collection of recent news articles related to agriculture in Uganda is compiled from online news sources. We also include links to recent publications on agricultural and policy related research topics pertinent to Uganda.

In news this week, we report on turning to ancient diets to alleviate modern ills among others.

Under agricultural and food policy related research, we provide links to papers on:

Thank you, and enjoy.

read more...