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SEMINAR PRESENTATIONS AT MAKERERE

2014 January 17
by bvancampenhout

Makerere-Seminar-31-01-14_html_67b95076Makerere-Seminar-31-01-14_html_11bf43f5Makerere-Seminar-31-01-14_html_70bf3c43

SEMINAR PRESENTATIONS AT MAKERERE
School of Agricultural Sciences

Friday, 31 January 2014 from 2:30—4:00 p.m.
School of Agricultural Sciences Conference Room

PRESENTATIONS:
Gender inequalities in ownership and control of land in Africa

Amber Peterman
University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill - USA

ABSTRACT: Over the past decade, stakeholders have made a variety of generalized claims concerning women’s landownership, both globally and in Africa. Typically, these claims include statements with single statistics, such as “women own less than 2 percent of the world’s land” or “women own approximately 15 percent of land in Africa south of the Sahara.” These claims are problematic because they are not substantiated by empirical evidence, do not reflect variations in landownership across or within countries, do not acknowledge differences in landownership regimes, nor address comparative ownership by men in the same contexts. Neither do they address the difference between ownership and control of land. The lack of a clear understanding behind statistics on gender and land also leads to an inability to clearly articulate a policy response to the potential inequalities faced by women and men. The objective of this paper is to explore, conceptually and empirically, the levels and relative inequalities in landownership between women and men in African countries. The first section of the paper engages in a conceptual discussion of how to measure gendered land outcomes, what ownership and control mean in different contexts, and why attention to these factors is important for the development of gender and land statistics. The second section of the paper systematically reviews existing evidence from microlevel large sample studies by region to summarize recent trends in land access, ownership, and control by sex. The third section presents new statistics from a variety of nationally representative and large-scale unpublished data on gender and land in Africa. Results provide not only a nuanced understanding of the importance of measuring land indicators for gendered development in Africa and globally but also new statistics on a variety of land outcomes to aid stakeholders in the discussion of gender-land inequalities.

Investigating the Gender Gap in Agricultural Productivity: Evidence from Uganda

Marguerite Duponchel
The International Growth Center - Uganda

ABSTRACT: Females make up 43 percent of the agricultural labor force in the developing world (FAO 2011). Yet substantive productivity gaps between male and female-headed households and male and female-managed plots have been widely documented. FAO (2011) estimates that closing these gaps could increase agricultural output in low income countries by 2.5 to 4 percent, thus reducing the number of undernourished by 12-17 per cent. This paper positions itself among the handful of studies that explore the nature of the gender gap using plot level analysis. We use the two latest rounds of data from the Uganda National Panel Survey collected in 2009/10 and 2010/11 that allow us to investigate the (in)efficiency of intra-household allocation of resources. We found that female-managed plots are on average 15 per cent less productive than male-managed plots but the gap in yield per acre almost entirely closes when controlling for manager’s characteristics, input use, investment and crop choices. The results point towards significant regional variations, with a persistent gender gap in the Western region. Targeted policies to address constraints faced by female farmers could substantially raise overall agricultural productivity in Uganda.

This seminar series is co-hosted by the Makerere School of Agricultural Sciences, the International Food Policy Research Institute, and the International Institute for Tropical Agriculture and is presented as a platform for information sharing of research findings on a broad range of topics relevant to agricultural production in Uganda.

Travel Grants For Young Researchers From Developing Countries

2014 January 16
by bvancampenhout

The International Economic Association will award a number of travel grants of up to the value of $2000 to young researchers from developing countries to attend the 17th World Congress to be held between June 6 to June 10 2014 on the Dead Sea, Jordan.
Each grant can be used to cover conference registration fee, flights, transportation to and from the congress venue from airport and any costs associated with living expenses (meals and refreshments during times when they are not provided by the local hosts) Those awarded the grant will have their hotel accommodation booked directly by the world congress organizing team. The cost of the hotel accommodation will be taken off the final grant paid out.

Please note that there are a very limited number of these grants available and preference will be given to those whose papers have been accepted and will be presenting papers at the contributed sessions of the IEA World Congress.

For more information, visit: http://www.iea-world.org/JordanCongress_TravelGrants.php

2014 Visiting Scholar Fellowship

2014 January 15
by bvancampenhout

The EASST Visiting Scholar Fellowship seeks to equip East African social scientists with the skills needed to carry out rigorous evaluations of economic development programs. During a four-month fellowship, researchers will be based at the University of California Berkeley. Fellows may visit either during the Fall semester (from August 20-December 20, 2014) or the Spring semester (from January 20-May 20, 2015).

Each Visiting Scholar will be paired with a faculty mentor affiliated with the Center for Effective Global Action (CEGA), a research network based in the United States. A list of CEGA faculty affiliates is available online at http://cega.berkeley.edu/faculty/. Additionally, CEGA staff and PhD students will provide support during the semester and once the scholar returns home. The fellowship program will pay for room and board in Berkeley, health insurance, monthly stipend, visa fees, and roundtrip air travel. CEGA staff will provide mentorship not only throughout the semester, but also once the scholar returns home.

Upon completing the fellowship, scholars are expected to return to a university or research institute in East Africa and assume a leading role in the global effort to use rigorous evaluation and evidence for economic development. Small grants of up to $8,000 will be provided to scholars who return to their home institution, to hold trainings in impact evaluation, build institutional capacity, or to forge new linkages with government policymakers.

For more information, visit http://cega.berkeley.edu/opportunities/2014-visiting-scholar-fellowship/

newsletter week of Jan 12, 2014

2014 January 13
by bvancampenhout

bull_smallHello, and welcome to the first IFPRI Uganda Strategy Support Program’s weekly news digest for the year 2014: Happy New Year

This weekly collection of recent news articles related to agriculture in Uganda is compiled from online news sources. We also include links to recent publications on agricultural and policy-related research topics pertinent to Uganda.

In news this week, we report on governement's demands for better access to finance for farmers and the FARM project in South Sudan.

Under agricultural and food policy related research, we provide links to papers on:

Thank you, and enjoy.
read more...

IFPRI Kampala Newsletter – week of Dec 15th 2013

2013 December 20
by bvancampenhout

copyright Abigail Childs

copyright Abigail Childs

Hello, and welcome to the IFPRI Uganda Strategy Support Program’s weekly news digest.

This weekly collection of recent news articles related to agriculture in Uganda is compiled from online news sources. We also include links to recent publications on agricultural and policy-related research topics pertinent to Uganda.
In news this week, we report on an interesting IITA project and agri-processing. We also provide an article for some of you who want to try something different than turkey for Christmas day.
Under agricultural and food policy related research, we provide links to papers on:

Thank you, and enjoy.
read more...

IFPRI Kampala Weekly Newsletter ed 9 Dec 2013

2013 December 16
by bvancampenhout

 

copyright Abigail Childs

copyright Abigail Childs

Hello, and welcome to the IFPRI Uganda Strategy Support Program’s weekly news digest.

This weekly collection of recent news articles related to agriculture in Uganda is compiled from online news sources. We also include links to recent publications on agricultural and policy-related research topics pertinent to Uganda.
In news this week, we report on the central role of women in agriculture, CIMMYT's efforts to halt a maize disease and an article on aflotoxins.


Under agricultural and food policy related research, we provide links to papers on:

Thank you, and enjoy.

read more...

Uganda SSP Weekly Newsletter – week of dec 2nd

2013 December 9
by bvancampenhout

copyright Abigail Childs

copyright Abigail Childs

Hello, and welcome to the IFPRI Uganda Strategy Support Program’s weekly news digest.

This weekly collection of recent news articles related to agriculture in Uganda is compiled from online news sources. We also include links to recent publications on agricultural and policy-related research topics pertinent to Uganda.
In news this week, both good news and bad news on Northern Uganda. Furthermore, Mps stress the importance of agriculture.

Under agricultural and food policy related research, we provide links to papers on:

Thank you, and enjoy.
read more...

2014 GTAP Conference to Highlight Food Policy, Trade

2013 December 4
by bvancampenhout

Since 1998, the Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP), coordinated by the Center for Global Trade Analysis at Purdue University, has organized an annual conference to promote the exchange of ideas among economists conducting quantitative analysis of global economic issues. In June 2014, the 17th Annual Conference will be co-organized by AGRODEP and held in Dakar, Senegal. This will mark the first time that the Annual Conference is hosted in West Africa, providing an important opportunity for local African researchers to engage with high-level academics and economists from around the world.

The 2014 Conference will focus on “New Challenges in Food Policy, Trade and Economic Vulnerability.” Submitted papers can cover an extensive array of topics under this theme, including: international trade and food security; international trade and finance; foreign direct investment in land and land markets; sustainable development; the integration of Africa into the world trade system; and the potential for Africa to “feed the world.”

Abstract submissions are due by January 15, 2014, with selected papers due by April 15. To learn more about the requirements for submission and event details, please visit the event webpage.

Newsletter week of november 25th

2013 December 2
by bvancampenhout

 

copyright Donald Kabuubi

copyright Donald Kabuubi/AP

IFPRI-Kampala weekly newsletter is out!!!

Hello, and welcome to the IFPRI Uganda Strategy Support Program’s weekly news digest.

This weekly collection of recent news articles related to agriculture in Uganda is compiled from online news sources. We also include links to recent publications on agricultural and policy-related research topics pertinent to Uganda.
In news this week, a new banana disease poses risk to Uganda. There are two articles (Is Africa ready for GM? and Uganda Debates the Introduction of Genetically Modified Organisms) on GMOs and one on climate change.

Under agricultural and food policy related research, we provide links to the following reports and papers:

Thank you, and enjoy.
read more...

Next CGIAR-Kampala seminar on Wednesday 4th of December, from 14.00 to 15.00 PM

2013 December 2
by bvancampenhout

Dear All,

 

We are pleased to invite you to the next CGIAR-Uganda Research-seminar at IITA/IFPRI, Naguru East Road plot 15, Kampala on Wednesday 4th of December, from 14.00 to 15.00 PM

 

Impact Evaluation of the HarvestPlus Project Developing and Delivering Biofortified Crops in Uganda: Baseline Report
By

 

Lucy Billings, research analyst with IFPRI in the Poverty Health and Nutrition Division providing research support to IFPRI projects in East and Southern Africa.

 

Biofortification is an agricultural-based strategy for addressing micronutrient deficiency at a population level through the introduction of crops bred with a high level of target micronutrients. HarvestPlus is currently implementing a project in Uganda that aims to reach 225,000 farming households with vitamin A-rich orange sweet potatoes and high iron beans over five years. For biofortification to be an effective strategy for reducing micronutrient deficiency on a large scale in Uganda, it will be necessary to achieve a relatively high equilibrium level of adoption in targeted communities as the majority of households gain access to these crops for consumption through cultivation, rather than through markets. The impact evaluation of the HarvestPlus project employs a randomized control design with three treatment arms plus one comparison arm to learn the optimal saturation rate of households in a community with planting material for widespread and sustained adoption of biofortified crops, the effect of social networks on adoption and the impact of a payback scheme on encouraging diffusion of biofortified crops outside of the targeted beneficiary communities.

Please note that the next CGIAR-Uganda Research- seminar will be on Wednesday February 5th 2014, 14.00 PM.

If you are interested to present at a CGIAR-Uganda Research-seminar, please let us know!

CGIAR-Kampala research seminars take place every first wednesday of the month between 2 and 3 pm. They are born out of the desire of a group of researchers to discuss their research in depth to peers, as opposed to presenting summaries and policy recommendations in our daily outreach to policy makers. As such, potential presenters should not shy away from more technical issues that they want comments and feedback on.